Friday, March 23, 2018

VICTORIA AND JUDI, by Stephen Michaels

There’s something quite remarkable about Dame Judi Dench. Whether it’s her award-winning career, her passion for Shakespeare, or her fondness for playing rebellious and empowering women, it is clear that she is an unequivocally talented actress. In Victoria and Abdul, her fifth and most recent collaboration with director Stephen Frears, her talents are put on display like never before.

In the movie, she returns to the role of Queen Victoria, a role she previously took on in John Madden’s film Mrs. Brown. In recognition of this unique accomplishment, The Egyptian Theatre showed a double feature on Tuesday, November 28th, 2017 at the Egyptian Theatre - both movies, with Judi Dench in attendance between films. It would be an understatement to note that the theatre was packed in anticipation. Members of the audience brought her flowers, the room crackled with energy, and Ms. Dench received a standing ovation upon entering the room.

Monday, March 19, 2018


With Isle of Dogs - a new stop-motion film from Wes Anderson - on the horizon, now marks a good time to look at his past work and those films that influenced him. While many of those films have played alongside his own work - The River, To Be or Not To Be, and The Magnificent Ambersons were shown in recent weeks at the Aero and Egyptian - the Cinematheque has set aside an entire night for one of the primary influences on Fantastic Mr. Fox: Ladislas Starewitch’s The Tale of the Fox. Anderson remarked in interviews that he and his team looked at it in preparation, and the two have a great deal more in common than just foxes. Both feature cunning protagonists willing to say anything to get out of a jam and fuel their fun, both are beautiful and playful in their animation style, and both move at a raucous pace.

Saturday, March 10, 2018


In Partnership with George Eastman Museum and the Academy Film Archive, 
the American Cinematheque Will Exhibit Two Nitrate Film Prints to the Public 
at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood in March

Presented in partnership with George Eastman Museum and the 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Director Carol Reed gives young actor Bobby Henrey direction on the set of THE FALLEN IDOL. Photo: Getty
About Nitrate Film:

Film prints are no longer made on nitrate film stock and haven't been since the 1950s. It is a coveted format that cineastes enjoy seeing projected as it has a particular picture quality. Surviving nitrate films have to be kept in special storage conditions. Nitrate film will even continue burning underwater. In the first half of the 20th century, nitrate was a widely used film base, despite the danger of combustion. Nitrate was the first material that was flexible, strong and transparent enough to carry motion picture frames through the wheels and gates of a motion picture projector.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018


With awards season now behind us, we take a look back at the many Oscar-nominated guests that have joined us in person in the past year. We are fortunate to have been joined by all of the 2018 Oscar-nominated directors, all the nominated Art Directors, Set Decorators, and Film Editors, as well as several eventual Oscar winners! Below, enjoy a selection of photographs taken in-house at our Egyptian and Aero Theatres accompanied by words of wisdom they so graciously shared with our audience members. 

Monday, February 26, 2018


According to Oscar-winning Doctor Dolittle composer/writer Leslie Bricusse, the 1967 musical fantasy was initially conceived as a reunion of the My Fair Lady Broadway team: star Rex Harrison, lyricist and book writer Alan Jay Lerner, composer Frederick Loewe, and director Moss Hart.

Dr. Dolittle, played by Rex Harrison, in the company of Chee-Chee the Chimpanzee, Polynesia the Parrot and, last but not least, the Great Pink Sea Snail! 

Bricusse and the film’s leading lady Samantha Eggar will be on hand at the Aero Theatre Saturday, March 3, 2018 after a matinee screening of gorgeous new 4K restoration of Doctor Dolittle, the 1967 musical based on Hugh Lofting’s famous stories about a Victorian British doctor who can talk to animals – including a giant pink sea snail!

Thursday, February 15, 2018


“Pilgrims” would perhaps be a fitting term to describe the horde of fans who flocked to the Egyptian Theatre to witness the surreal cinema of Alejandro Jodorowsky, and see the master himself in a rare appearance (his first time in Los Angeles in twenty years). The first feature of the evening, The Holy Mountain, was about a spiritual quest, and one could sense a similar ambition in the air tonight from the moviegoers themselves. One had flown in all the way from New York to see him. The appeal, according to one fan, was “the sheer surrealism, the trip that is THAT.” Another, less eloquent but no less fitting, was excited to see some movies he described as “weird as [expletive retracted]."